Decision Making

Following a detailed review it has been proposed that a West of England Mayoral Combined Authority would be the most effective way to manage the new money and powers from central government here in the region. Click here to read this document.

Central government would hand more money and powers to the West of England with greater local control over how the money is to be spent.

How would a West of England Mayoral Combined Authority work?

A West of England Mayoral Combined Authority would receive powers from central government – it would not take powers from existing local authorities without agreement.

  • It would be chaired by a West of England Mayor who the public would vote for in May 2017.
  • The members of the West of England Mayoral Combined Authority would be the West of England Mayor, the leaders of Bath & North East Somerset and South Gloucestershire councils and the Mayor of Bristol.
  • The West of England Mayor would be given powers over spending, previously held by central government, on the region’s transport, housing, adult education and skills.
  • They would not replace Bristol’s directly elected Mayor or the leaders of Bath & North East Somerset and South Gloucestershire councils.
  • A West of England Mayoral Combined Authority, including a West of England Mayor, would be scrutinised and held to account by a West of England Overview and Scrutiny and Audit committee(s).

How will votes be taken?

To make decisions, a majority of the members of a West of England Combined Authority, including the West of England Mayor, would be required to be present and voting. The West of England Mayor would:

  • Have one vote, as would the other voting authority members.
  • The West of England Mayor would have to consult combined authority members on his/her strategies, which those members may reject if two out of three agree to do so.
  • Members of a West of England Mayoral Combined Authority would also be able to amend a West of England Mayor’s spending plans if two out of three agree to do so.
  • Decisions made on the Joint Spatial Plan would require a unanimous vote.
  • Certain financial aspects would require unanimous agreement of the three councils.
  • The Mayoral Combined Authority must have the agreement of an individual authority where a planning or transport matter (for example) is likely to impact on that authority’s specific geographical location.